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The Legendary ‘The Price is Right’ host, Bob Barker Passed Away at 99

Bob Barker, who hosted a TV show called The Price is Right that represented American buying habits, died on August 26. Older people know him from his TV show, and younger people might recognize him as someone Barney Stinson called “father” on a show until Barney met his real father.

Barker started being the host of The Price is Right in 1972. He was an animal lover and an activist for animal causes. He began to speak up for animals and support animal rights causes. He helped groups like United Activists for Animal Rights, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, and the Sea Shephard Conservation Society.

In 2007, Barker stopped hosting The Price is Right after being on TV for 50 years. Even after retiring, he sometimes showed up on TV until 2015.

Why does Barney Stinson(Neil Patrick Harris) call Barner “father”?

The tale is about Barney Stinson (played by Neil Patrick Harris), a kid who has no father. This carefree boy later became a serial womanizer and would ask his mom about his dad, but she would tell him untrue things. Finally, Barney’s mom, Loretta gets frustrated and points to the TV, saying that Bob Barker is his dad.

Bob Barker
Bob Barker hosted The Price is Right (Credits: The Economic Times)

Also Read: Bob Barker Net Worth: How Rich is The Television Star?

This news motivates Barney Stinson to get ready and appear on The Price is Right. In the second season of the show, Barney goes on The Price is Right and wins all the prizes. He is close to revealing to Bob Barker that he is his son, but he changes his mind and does not say anything.

After some time, Barney and his friends find out that a pastor named Sam Gibbs is the father of James, who is Barney’s half-brother and is both gay and black. This makes Barney believe that he is also part black. Eventually, Loretta informs Barney that Sam is not his father.

Barney starts feeling better about being left behind by his dad when he meets his actual father,  Jerome Whittaker. He had believed Jerome Whittaker was his uncle. He discovers this by accident when the Met Museum notes that when he was nine, Barney had accidentally knocked over the skeleton of a big blue whale. 

When Marshall’s dad passes away, Barney is prepared to meet his real father. However, he is really let down because his biological father has become a regular suburban dad instead of a guy who enjoys drinking scotch and chasing women, like Barney. In a later season, Barney even attempts to get his mom and Jerome back together, but then he realizes that his mom is back with James’ father, Sam Gibbs.

Bob Barker
Legendary game show host Bob Barker at the last taping of “The Price is Right Million Dollar Spectacular,” in 2007. (Credits: NPR)

Also Read: Travis Barker Then And Now: Blink-182 Drummer’s Sufferings Over The Years

Remembering Bob Barker’s life and career

When Bob Barker was in college at Drury, he got his first job in the media at KTTS-FM Radio in Springfield. After that, he and his wife moved to Lake Worth Beach, Florida. He worked as a news editor and announcer at WWPG 1340 AM in Palm Beach (now WPBR in Lantana). In 1950, he went to California to do better in his broadcasting career. He got his own radio show called “The Bob Barker Show” and it ran for six years in Burbank.

Barker began being the host of “Truth or Consequences” on December 31, 1956, and he kept doing the show until 1975.

In 1956, while Barker was doing radio work, a producer named Ralph Edwards asked him to try out as the new host of “Truth or Consequences”. It was a game show where people in the audience had to do funny and strange challenges if they could not answer a question. The questions were like jokes, and nobody was actually supposed to know the answers.

Also Read: Farewell to Hersha Parady, the beloved ‘Little House in the Prairie’ Actress, Dies at 78

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